8.2 Unsubstantiated Claims (and three questions) about the Meaning and Scope of "Integration" in Jewish and Non-denominational Educational Settings

Welcome! If you’ve made it past the unfortunate title of this post, then there’s something wrong with you: you care. Caring is SO 1990!! Caring means responding, it means engaging in dialogue. It means lovingly denying the premise of the argument. It means sharing your thoughts with me or someone you like more.

Which brings me to the premise (AKA unsubstantiated claim #1):

(1) “Integration” is NOT about making cross curricular references between otherwise discrete and alienated academic disciplines. If that’s the essence/ big idea of integration then “lame” on us!

(2) Integration is a noun and not a verb. It’s not content specific. It’s actually a “process” (really a series of processes).

(3) Integration is a series of processes that reflects a deep and natural human yearning: to be whole. The precondition for integration– the thing that makes integration a necessary process– is the fact that our world is fragmented and broken. The fact that teachers who share walls don’t share goals is but one dim reflection of the shattered world which we are blessed to inhabit. Sadly it’s not our biggest problem.

(4) God has many names: Truth, Good, Beauty, Love, Endlessness, Dwelling… Another name for God is “One.” God is Indivisible Unity. God is Perfect and Seamless Integration. God is Process.

(5) The Divine image that resides within every human being remembers the experience of Oneness that we once self-consciously enjoyed (and still CAN enjoy) but more often than not fail to affirm. Healthy individuals integrate all the time and even have moments of joyful affirmation. Spiritually unhealthy individuals need to be guided back to an understanding of how to integrate. Healthy and unhealthy aren’t meant to be judgments. I’m sorry that they sound like judgments and would love better vocab.

(6) Children know how to integrate IN SPITE of adults. Maybe it’s because they’re closer to the initial experience of Oneness. Maybe it’s because they’re children (but that would be a “tot”-ology). If we think that children are unable to integrate then we need to evaluate the conditions that we’ve imposed upon them that undermine this natural human process. I’m arguing that these conditions are generally unconscious, deeply embedded, and invariably lamentable and arbitrary.

(7) Two critical areas where the process of integration radically transforms social and educational experience (and therefore makes the world more integrated, whole, and healthy):

             Home/School– There is nothing more powerful than the integration of these two institutions. Nothing should be easier. Happens all the time right? Go figure.

             Learning/Living– The places where we learn and the places where we live (i.e. act, interact, impact) need to integrate. The school bell should never actually ring. Learning should be learning, learning should be living, living should be learning, living should be living, and this sentence should stop.

(8) Integration undermines the rigidity of roles and strips away the illusions that perpetuate the compartmentalization, departmentalization, Procrustian Bed-itization, Not In My Back Yard-itization, of the human experience. Teachers are students, students are teachers. We’re all in this together. Kumbaya.

Three Questions:


If you’ve made it this far then let’s ask:

(1) What identity markers am I so tied to that I can’t experience the transcendent/grounded fullness of being a radically integrating, processing, striving, embracing creature of God?

(2) Why aren’t more hugs initiated and received on any given day?

(3) Why do I say hello to some people I pass on the street and not others?

Sincerely,

Micah

            

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